Haiku Poems

As part of their poetry unit, the students in 3/4C have been learning about haiku poems.

Haiku poems originate in Japan and traditionally celebrate an appreciation for beauty and nature. Plants, animals, seasons, water and weather are often the subjects of haiku.

A haiku poem has 3 lines and 17 syllables with the following format

Line 1: 5 syllables

Line 2: 7 syllables

Line 3: 5 syllables

After selecting a topic, the students in 3/4C brainstormed words and phrases associated with their topic.

There was some problem solving involved to meet the required syllable count. Students also had to make sure their poems paint a picture in the readers’ minds. Some students looked at a thesaurus or online synonym generator like this one to improve their word choices.

Here are a selection of published haiku poems from 3/4C.

This has been a guest post by Mrs Morris who is filling in for Miss Jordan for the rest of the term. 

What did you think of our poetry?

Leave a haiku poem of your own in the comments!

Fun With Figurative Language!

This week, we started a poetry study in our writing lessons.

Students have participated in “poetry investigation” all week. This means we read lots of poems and analysed how they are written. Students observed the mood of different poems and the writing craft that is used.

We discussed what we sometimes see in poems. Here are some of our thoughts:

  • Humour
  • Emotions or feelings
  • Rhyming
  • Rhythm
  • Repeated words or phrases
  • Descriptive language
  • Inferences
  • A message or moral
  • A twist

We also focussed on how figurative language is used in poetry. We investigated six different kinds of figurative language:

  • Alliteration
  • Metaphor
  • Simile
  • Hyperbole (hy-per-bol-ee)
  • Personification
  • Onomatopoeia (on-o-mat-o-pia)

Figurative Language

Some of these types of figurative language were new to the students and they enjoyed learning the new vocabulary. Learning how to say hyperbole, onomatopoeia and personification was a challenge!

For their main task today, students worked in pairs to read a variety of poems. Their challenge was to identify which types of figurative language were present in each poem. Everyone did a fantastic job and it was great to listen to the conversations as they investigated the figurative language.

 

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Write some examples of figurative language in your comment!

What have you learnt about poetry so far?

Do you have a favourite poem?

We Love Poetry!

The students in 3/4C are thoroughly enjoying our poetry unit.

Earlier in the term, we investigated poems and learnt about figurative language in poetry. Now, all students have started their own poetry anthology.

Students have written several poems for their anthology, including:

  • Observations in our environment
  • Colours
  • Environmental issues
  • Family
  • Free choice

The poems written by the students for most of our unit have not been of a particular structure, so they have had a lot of freedom with the style, organisation and layout of their poems. However, earlier this week, we did investigate five types of popular poem structures. They are:

  • Cinquain poems
  • Haiku poems
  • Concrete poems
  • Limericks
  • Diamante poems

Each of these styles of poems have specific features and a set structure. They are described below.

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The enthusiasm of the 3/4C students during our poetry unit has been absolutely fantastic! Miss Jordan is very proud of all their work!

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What is your favourite structured poem?

What do you like to write poems about?

***Please choose one of the structured poems and write a poem in your comment!***

Figurative Language in Poetry

This week, we started a poetry study in our writing lessons.

Students have participated in “poetry investigation” all week. This means we read lots of poems and analysed how they are written. Students observed the mood of different poems and the writing craft that is used.

We discussed what we sometimes see in poems. Here are some of our thoughts:

  • Humour
  • Emotions or feelings
  • Rhyming
  • Rhythm
  • Repeated words or phrases
  • Descriptive language
  • Inferences
  • A message or moral
  • A twist

We also focussed on how figurative language is used in poetry. Today, we investigated six different kinds of figurative language:

  • Alliteration
  • Metaphor
  • Simile
  • Hyperbole (hy-per-bol-ee)
  • Personification
  • Onomatopoeia (on-o-mat-o-pia)

Figurative Language

Some of these types of figurative language were new to the students and they enjoyed learning the new vocabulary. Learning how to say hyperbole and onomatopoeia was a challenge!

For their main task today, students worked in pairs to read a variety of poems. Their challenge was to identify which types of figurative language were present in each poem. Everyone did a fantastic job and it was great to listen to the conversations as they investigated the figurative language.

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Write some examples of figurative language in your comment!

What have you learnt about poetry so far?

Do you have a favourite poem?

Our Poetry Study

This week, we started a poetry study in our writing lessons.

Students have participated in “poetry immersion” all week. This means we read lots of poems and analysed how they are written. Students observed the mood of different poems and the writing craft that is used.

We discussed what we sometimes see in poems. Here are some of our thoughts:

  • Humour
  • Emotions or feelings
  • Rhyming
  • Rhythm
  • Repeated words or phrases
  • Descriptive language
  • Similes
  • Metaphors
  • “Show me, don’t tell me”
  • A message or moral
  • A twist

We also focussed on how figurative language is used in poetry. We investigated six different kinds of figurative language:

  • Alliteration
  • Metaphor
  • Similie
  • Hyperbole (hy-per-bol-ee)
  • Personification
  • Onomatopoeia (on-o-mat-o-pia)

Figurative Language

Some of these types of figurative language were new to the students and they enjoyed learning the new vocabulary. Learning how to say hyperbole and onomatopoeia was a challenge!

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Today, students used the knowledge they have gained about the art of poetry to write their own poems. First, we went outside and observed the environment around us. Students took notes of the things they could see, hear, smell and feel.

We then used these observations as inspiration for our poetry. Everyone did an amazing job! You can read all of the poems in the slideshow below. Click the full screen icon to view the poems properly. Enjoy!

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What do you think of the poems?

Can you find any examples of figurative language in the poems?

What have you learnt about poetry so far?

Poetry Study – Part Two

During the past few weeks, we have been studying poetry as our writing focus.

After analysing a variety of poems in class, students then wrote poems about a variety of topics, including:

  • The Environment
  • Feelings and/or emotions
  • Our class novel, The One and Only Ivan
  • Lighthearted/humour
  • Free choice

Students used the writing process to perfect their poems. We have been using the writing process for all of our genres this year and it has really helped everyone to develop their writing skills.

We looked at a wide variety of poems and discussed that some poems follow a certain structure (eg. Haiku poems, cinquain poems, limericks, rhyming poems). When writing their own poems, students were encouraged to focus on language, word choice and rhythm rather than specific structures. The results were very impressive!

 

 

 

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What did you think of our poems?

What kind of poems do you like to write?

Write a poem in your comment!

Poetry Study

This week we have started a poetry study in our writing lessons.

Our poetry study will feature two areas of learning:

  • First, students will participate in “poetry immersion”. In class we are currently reading lots of poems and analysing how they are written. Students are observing the mood of different poems and the writing craft that is used.
  • Next, students will begin drafting their own poems to publish.

We discussed what we sometimes see in poems. Here are some of our thoughts:

  • Humour
  • Emotions or feelings
  • Rhyming
  • Rhythm
  • Repeated words or phrases
  • Descriptive language
  • Similes
  • Metaphors
  • “Show me, don’t tell me”
  • A message or moral
  • A twist

We also brainstormed types of poems we already know:

  • Haiku
  • Cinquain
  • Limerick
  • Rhyming
  • Colour
  • Concrete/Shape
  • Acrostic

The Australian Children’s Poetry website is a great resource. It contains an extensive collection of poems written by Australian poets.

Australian Children's Poetry website

Here is a short, humourous cartoon about a boy who wrote a poem.


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Challenge – in your comment, write a poem titled “Cold”.

It can be any kind of poem you like!

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Do you have a favourite poem?

What sort of poems do you like writing?

What are your favourite poetry themes or topics?

What have you been observing in the poems we are studying in class?

Colour Poems

Yesterday, Mrs Morris taught 4B while Miss Jordan was at a professional development day. One of the activities the students worked on with Mrs Morris was a colour poem.

We take in our surroundings using all five senses: sight, hearing, taste, touch and smell. The students in 4B reflected on this and created a poem that described a colour using the five senses. They used lots of adjectives (describing words) and descriptive imagery in their writing.

The students created their poems by:

    1. brainstorming their ideas
    2. drafting their poem
    3. publishing their work

The published pieces are all fantastic and really create a clear image in the reader’s mind!

Tip: click on “full screen” to view the poems more clearly.

4B now have a colourful display of their poetry to brighten up their classroom!

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What feedback do you have for the 4B poets?

Could you write your own colour poem in a comment?