Mathematical Word Problems

In maths, we have been developing our skills to solve mathematical word problems.

We have been following a five step process to solve word problems:

Some word problems require one calculation, while others are multi-step problems. When calculating their answers, students are required to:

  • record all of their working out
  • justify their calculations to ensure their final answer is a reasonable solution to the problem.

The word problems we have been solving involve all four processes:

  • addition
  • subtraction
  • multiplication
  • division

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In your comment, please type a mathematical word problem for someone to solve!

More Fun With Problem Solving!

Today in maths, 3/4C enjoyed another problem solving session.

Our school numeracy coach, Mrs Hillbrick, joined in the fun and participated with the 3/4C mathematicians.

Today’s lesson was called “Plants” and was adapted from the NRICH site.

Watch the presentation below to see how the problem unfolds.

The students did a fabulous job of using problem solving strategies. The main strategy the students adopted was “guess, check and improve” and some students moved on to “working systematically“.

Here are the 3/4C mathematicians using counters and Venn diagrams to solve the problem.

All students experienced success by finding multiple solutions. The highest amount of solutions found was 16!

How many solutions to the plants problem can you find?

Did you achieve the success criteria for this lesson?

What strategies did you use to solve the problem?

What are the benefits of problem solving activities?

 

Mathematical Problem Solving

Today, our numeracy coach Mrs Hillbrick visited our classroom for some mathematical fun.

We started our maths lesson with one of our favourite warm up games – Hit the Target.

We then worked on a problem solving task with Mrs Hillbrick.

Our learning focus for the lesson:

We are learning to find multiple solutions to a problem.

Our success criteria for the lesson:

We can:

  • Read the problem in our head
  • Share our understanding
  • Use guess, check and improve
  • Check for accuracy
  • Reflect as mathematicians

Mrs Hillbrick posed the following question…

My telephone number has 8 digits. When I add up each of the 8 digits, I get a 2 digit number. When I add those 2 digits together, I get a number less than 4. What could my telephone number be?

To break down the problem, we had to:

  • Circle the numbers
  • Put a box around the key words
  • Underline the key question

Students then had a go at finding solutions to this problem.

At the conclusion of the lesson, we reflected on the success criteria to determine how we went with this task.

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Did you achieve the success criteria?

What skills did you need to use to complete this problem solving task?

In your comment, have a go at coming up with a solution to the problem!

Guest Post: Problem Solving With Mrs Morris

This is a guest post by Mrs Morris. Mrs Morris used to team teach with Miss Jordan. She is currently on family leave looking after her baby girl.

Today was planning day for the grade three and four teachers. While the teachers were busy getting ready for next term, the students rotated around different classrooms for some exciting lessons.

Mrs Morris took all the grade threes and fours for a forty minute problem solving lesson. The lesson was called “Plants” and was adapted from the NRICH site. 

Watch the presentation below to see how the problem unfolds.

The students did a fabulous job of using problem solving strategies. Many started with “guess, check and improve” and some students moved on to “working systematically”.

Here are some of the 4A and 4B mathematicians using counters and Venn diagrams to try to solve the problem.

Plants Problem Solving 1

Plants Problem Solving 2

Plants Problem Solving 3

Plants Problem Solving 4

 

Many students found six or more solutions with a small number of children finding 11 or 12 possible arrangements!

How many solutions to the plants problem can you find?

What strategies did you use to solve the problem?