The Science Master Replied!

Earlier this week the grade four students reflected on science topics they were curious about and sent a question to The Science Master.

Click here to find the original post.

The Science Master is a safe site run by a retired teacher/scientist to help students learn more about the world we live in.

We are amazed and excited to report that The Science Master has personally answered all of our questions in a matter of days!

Alice, Daisy and Eliza asked, “what chemicals make objects glow in the dark?”

The Science Master explained words that end with the term “escence” and suggested an experiment the girls could try with an adult. Click on the image to find The Science Master’s response.

Silas and Zakk asked, “why do volcanoes erupt?”

The Science Master discussed how volcanic eruption is all about pressure. He invited the boys to ask another question if they want clarification.

Billie and Zali wanted to know “how does the activator form slime?”

The Science Master gave an explanation of the chemistry behind slime ingredients and included a video. 

Chelsea and Ashli were curious to know, “if all living things were in one food chain, what would be at the top?”

The Science Master linked to a game to learn more about food chains and explained a ranking system called the trophic level.

Update!

Chelsea has already replied to the Science Master. Well done, Chelsea!

The Science Master replied back to Chelsea.

Angus and Lachy want to know “are aliens real?”

The Science Master offered a very interesting opinion and also linked to another question about aliens. 

Our last question was an explosive one! Freddie and Flynn asked “when the Sun blows up will Mercury smash into Earth

Luckily for us, The Science Master doesn’t think this will be happening any time soon and offered some interesting insights into the solar system. He also included a video and asked the boys a question.

We want to say a big thank you to The Science Master and his team for all the hard work he put into our answers.

animated-thank-you-image-0023

Now it’s time to comment…

Look at the clues The Science Master offered and discuss the topic with your family or friends. What do you think the answers are?

Science Master

Our students love their weekly science lessons with Mrs Olsen. This year they have been learning about the Earth, properties and materials, and how to conduct experiments. 

Today the grade four students tried out a fun resource called The Science Master.

www.sciencemaster.co.uk

This is a safe site run by a retired scientist and teacher in England. It is a place where you can submit your own science question and get a personalised answer.

The Science Master won’t answer your question directly, but give you clues to figure it out for yourself.

Our students brainstormed their ideas with a friend. The Science Master tells us that science is ‘applied curiosity’ so we had a think about what we were curious about. How do things work? Why are things the way they are?

We don’t know all the answers to the way the world works, but science can help.

Here are the questions we submitted on the The Science Master website.

We will be on the lookout for responses to our questions. Stay tuned!

Want to try The Science Master for yourself?

Here is some information that might help:

  • Anyone between the ages of 7 and 13 can submit a question on The Science Master website.
  • You don’t need an email address and don’t need to submit any personal information.
  • Before you submit a question, you need to search the site to see if the question has already been answered.
  • Always have a teacher or parent check your question before you submit it.

What question would you like The Science Master to answer?

What do you think the answers to our questions are?

What is your favourite area of science?

Volcanoes in Science!

Each Wednesday morning, we have science with Mrs Olsen.

We all look forward to our science lessons and it is great to see the students’ knowledge develop each week. Mrs Olsen has commented that she is impressed with the curiosity and love of learning displayed by the 3/4C students during science.

One student is selected as Mrs Olsen’s assistant each week…they dress up to look the part!

Today, we concluded our focus on “earth science”. We learnt about volcanoes. A volcano is defined as a mountain that opens downward to a pool of molten rock below the surface of the earth. When pressure builds up, eruptions occur. Gases and rock shoot up through the opening and spill over or fill the air with lava fragments.

The learning focus for today’s lesson:

  • We are learning how volcanoes are formed.

The success criteria:

  • I can describe the main ways volcanoes are formed.
  • I can make a model of a volcano.
  • I can research to find out more information about volcanoes.
  • I can make observations when doing research and making my model.

We learnt some key vocabulary about volcanoes in this lesson:

  • Magma
  • Lava
  • Tectonic plates
  • Pumice rocks
  • Cinder cone
  • Dormant volcanoes
  • Active volcanoes
  • Composite volcanoes
  • Shield volcanoes
  • Obsidian

After discussing how volcanoes are formed, completing some research and watching a video, students worked in groups to make their own ‘mini volcanoes’ in the classroom.

The equipment required to make the volcanoes:

  • Cup
  • Play dough
  • Plate
  • Vinegar
  • Bicarb soda
  • Food colouring

***

Thank you for all of the engaging science lessons so far, Mrs Olsen!

It is fantastic to build our science skills, knowledge and understanding. We are looking forward to learning about “forces” in our next science unit this term.

***

Can you define any of the key vocabulary from today’s science lesson?

What did you learn about volcanoes?

What science lesson have you enjoyed most so far this year?

What do you hope to learn in future science lessons?

 

Winter Solstice

Mrs Morris had the chance to teach 4A and 4B again during the week while their teachers had a planning day. We investigated the Winter Solstice. 

The Winter Solstice is the shortest day of the year. It will be happening in the Southern Hemisphere this Saturday 21st June. After the solstice, the days will start to get longer again.

This video helped us understand more about the seasons, solstices and equinoxes.

Many people from different cultures enjoy celebrating the solstices each year. In some countries, like the USA, the solstices mark the first day of winter and summer.

Many 4A and 4B students noticed that the sun had been setting earlier and rising later recently. We investigated the sunrise and sunset times throughout the year to see how they change during each season.

The students worked with a partner to create a table in Pages on their iPad. They used the website timeanddate.com to calculate day lengths.

Bebe and Jaz investigated the 24th of each month over the last year.

Bebe and Jaz sunrise sunset table

Eevie and Alex researched the 8th of each month.

Eevie sunrise sunset table

Tip: click on the tables to make them larger.

What patterns can you see from looking at the tables?

What other facts could you share about the solstices?