Volcanoes in Science!

Each Wednesday morning, we have science with Mrs Olsen.

We all look forward to our science lessons and it is great to see the students’ knowledge develop each week. Mrs Olsen has commented that she is impressed with the curiosity and love of learning displayed by the 3/4C students during science.

One student is selected as Mrs Olsen’s assistant each week…they dress up to look the part!

Today, we concluded our focus on “earth science”. We learnt about volcanoes. A volcano is defined as a mountain that opens downward to a pool of molten rock below the surface of the earth. When pressure builds up, eruptions occur. Gases and rock shoot up through the opening and spill over or fill the air with lava fragments.

The learning focus for today’s lesson:

  • We are learning how volcanoes are formed.

The success criteria:

  • I can describe the main ways volcanoes are formed.
  • I can make a model of a volcano.
  • I can research to find out more information about volcanoes.
  • I can make observations when doing research and making my model.

We learnt some key vocabulary about volcanoes in this lesson:

  • Magma
  • Lava
  • Tectonic plates
  • Pumice rocks
  • Cinder cone
  • Dormant volcanoes
  • Active volcanoes
  • Composite volcanoes
  • Shield volcanoes
  • Obsidian

After discussing how volcanoes are formed, completing some research and watching a video, students worked in groups to make their own ‘mini volcanoes’ in the classroom.

The equipment required to make the volcanoes:

  • Cup
  • Play dough
  • Plate
  • Vinegar
  • Bicarb soda
  • Food colouring

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Thank you for all of the engaging science lessons so far, Mrs Olsen!

It is fantastic to build our science skills, knowledge and understanding. We are looking forward to learning about “forces” in our next science unit this term.

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Can you define any of the key vocabulary from today’s science lesson?

What did you learn about volcanoes?

What science lesson have you enjoyed most so far this year?

What do you hope to learn in future science lessons?

 

Winter Solstice

Mrs Morris had the chance to teach 4A and 4B again during the week while their teachers had a planning day. We investigated the Winter Solstice. 

The Winter Solstice is the shortest day of the year. It will be happening in the Southern Hemisphere this Saturday 21st June. After the solstice, the days will start to get longer again.

This video helped us understand more about the seasons, solstices and equinoxes.

Many people from different cultures enjoy celebrating the solstices each year. In some countries, like the USA, the solstices mark the first day of winter and summer.

Many 4A and 4B students noticed that the sun had been setting earlier and rising later recently. We investigated the sunrise and sunset times throughout the year to see how they change during each season.

The students worked with a partner to create a table in Pages on their iPad. They used the website timeanddate.com to calculate day lengths.

Bebe and Jaz investigated the 24th of each month over the last year.

Bebe and Jaz sunrise sunset table

Eevie and Alex researched the 8th of each month.

Eevie sunrise sunset table

Tip: click on the tables to make them larger.

What patterns can you see from looking at the tables?

What other facts could you share about the solstices?